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We wanted to switch from the local company we had been insuring our house with because their correspondance has always been very rude and they are very difficult to deal with to USAA who we do all of our banking, brokerage, car & boat insurance through and are very courteous and extremely easy to deal with. We were denied coverage because our home does not have central air or heating. We live in South Central Florida so a heating system would be an absolute waste of money (the wall unit in the Great Room and a space heater in the bedroom are more than sufficient to make the house hospitable in the few welcome days of winter cold enough to warrant their use). My wife and I both cannot stand Air Conditioning and would never use Central A/C other than the one or two times a year we would normally turn on our wall unit when it is too hot to bear and the windows and doors cannot be left open. Houses have existed for Milleniums prior to the invention of Central Climate Control and I am sure home insurance existed atleast a few decades before the invention of air conditioning. Why would not having central climate control be a disqualifying factor in getting home insurance coverage? I highly doubt that not having A/C or heat is going to make our house any more likely to be damaged or destroyed in a hurricane, robbed or flooded. Opening the windows and doors instead of having a HVAC system consistantly running in our house makes us less suseptable to fire.
Jeanbug: Yes I did ask them why and the reason that they gave me was that “it is unusual for a house as new as yours to not have central climate control”. They wouldn’t have had a problem insuring my home if it was older and did not have Central Climate Control. Yeah, doesn’t make sense.

mbrcatz: Your answer is one of the absolute worst uneducated, wanting to sound smart anwers on Yahoo answers I have ever heard. You exemplify all of the other “Top Contributers” who attain the rank by just answering as many questions as possible without actually knowing what you are talking about. There is absolutely nothing contained in state or county codes preventing occupancy if you have no Central Heat so your answer is absolutely false. My house was built in 2006 and has always been insured, so it has not been since the 80’s that you can’t insure a house without central heat and the house was not grandfathered in. The answer to your “obvious question” is no other maintenance or building c
mbrcatz: Your answer is one of the absolute worst uneducated, wanting to sound smart anwers on Yahoo answers I have ever heard. You exemplify all of the other “Top Contributers” who attain the rank by just answering as many questions as possible without actually knowing what you are talking about. There is absolutely nothing contained in state or county codes preventing occupancy if you have no Central Heat so your answer is absolutely false. My house was built in 2006 and has always been insured, so it has not been since the 80’s that you can’t insure a house without central heat and the house was not grandfathered in. The answer to your “obvious question” is no other maintenance or building code standards are lacking in the house. The house was inspected after final construction by the county building inspector who is a PE and was rated a 04 (Above Average) on construction quality and met or exceeded all state and county building code standards. Portions of the house were rein

5 Thoughts on Why would an insurance company deny me coverage for not having central air and heating?
  1. Reply
    Yirmiyahu
    October 18, 2011 at 7:04 am

    No A/C means mold.

  2. Reply
    Jeanbug
    October 18, 2011 at 7:38 am

    Did you ask them why?
    Where I live 1) lots of people don’t have ACs and 2) lots of older homes don’t have central heating either. These older homes rely instead on electric baseboard, propane, geothermal, radiators, or a wall mounted gas furnace….and those places have no problem getting insurance.

    I can see the insurance company getting a little worried about using space heaters since those ARE fire hazards, but the rest doesn’t make sense. I’d be switching companies myself.

  3. Reply
    StephenWeinstein
    October 18, 2011 at 7:43 am

    Space heaters make the house much more susceptible to fire.

    Two of the leading causes of house fires are space heaters being knocked over and objects placed too close to space heaters or even on space heaters catching fire.

    Leaving windows and doors open makes the contents of the house more susceptible to theft.

  4. Reply
    mbrcatz
    October 18, 2011 at 8:14 am

    It’s not about the no a/c, it’s about the no central heat.

    Houses without basic amenities, tend to have MUCH higher claims. Without central heat, you’ll be using a wood stove, or space heater, which drastically increase fire hazard. These days, you can’t even get a permit to occupy without central heat – even if you don’t need it. Milleniums ago, there was no insurance that had to pay if your house burned down – your cave, wouldn’t burn, and you’d be dead from smoke inhalation.

    It’s been since the 80’s that you can’t insure a house without indoor plumbing, a roof, adequate wiring (knob and tube no longer acceptable), and central heat. You’ve obviously been grandfathered in.

    And then that begs the obvious question – what OTHER maintenance or current building code standards are lacking in the house?

    It doesn’t help, that you’re in FLORIDA. The homeowners market in FL, companies WANTING to write new policies . . . is pretty spare. The ones that write it, want your house to be up to code, and wind resistant.

  5. Reply
    seekndlord
    October 18, 2011 at 8:54 am

    I insure homes in CA. Often times they are older and have no central HVAC units. Typically, the heaters are wall units, by default. Based on a recent conversation with an underwriter from SAFECO, installed wall units built before 2000 were susceptible to fire and by default, they decline ANY aged home with a pre-2000 wall heater, BUT newer ones are okay (with documentation).

    I concur with the other space heater answer related to fire. It’s not the newness of the home and everything else in the home, it’s the simplicity of the increased fire susceptibility that comes along with having a space heater.

    My suggestion: check & see if a newly installed wall heater would pass muster with carriers insuring homes in your area & have one installed.

    Best wishes, Eric

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