If youre buying house, how much lower than the appraised property value

Tips and Deals Forums Buying Your Home If youre buying house, how much lower than the appraised property value

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 7 years, 10 months ago.

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  • #208709

    Anonymous

    would you pay? Say that youre buying a house and the appraised property value for that house is 100k. What would be a good price to pay for that house? How much under, I mean?

  • #271481

    Anonymous

    First of all, you don’t get an appraisal until after you make an offer that is accepted by the seller, and second even after you get it, if comes out at or above your offer price, you can’t renegotiate the price anyway. Your offer should be based upon sales of similar properties in the neighborhood within the previous 6 months.

  • #275533

    The price one offers and pays for a house has precious little to do with appraised value. Rather, as another indicated, your offering price should be based upon recent and comparable sales in the immediate area. And that means you might pay MORE than appraised value. It all depends on the local market.

  • #440008

    Anonymous

    Stay away from debt consolidation or debt reduction firms – most of them are scams. And, don’t declare bankruptcy unless you have exhausted all your other options. Bankruptcy will report on your credit history for ten years and it can make it difficult for you to get a job or rent an apartment.

    Go to a community-based, non-profit consumer credit counseling agency that is accredited by the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. They can help you sort it all out and place you on a debt management plan if appropriate. They charge low fees and you can be assured they will pay your creditors if you enroll in their debt management plan. You have so such assurances with a debt consolidation or debt reduction firm

    You can reach the NFCC at 1-800-388-2227 or at http://www.nfcc.org.

  • #440383

    Anonymous

    Stay away from debt consolidation or debt reduction firms – most of them are scams. And, don’t declare bankruptcy unless you have exhausted all your other options. Bankruptcy will report on your credit history for ten years and it can make it difficult for you to get a job or rent an apartment.

    Go to a community-based, non-profit consumer credit counseling agency that is accredited by the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. They can help you sort it all out and place you on a debt management plan if appropriate. They charge low fees and you can be assured they will pay your creditors if you enroll in their debt management plan. You have so such assurances with a debt consolidation or debt reduction firm

    You can reach the NFCC at 1-800-388-2227 or at http://www.nfcc.org.

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