Captial One wont lower my interest rate, what should I do?

Tips and Deals Forums Consumer Credit Credit Cards Captial One wont lower my interest rate, what should I do?

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    • #209814
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I havent used my credit card for over a year (I cut it up), because Im paying it off. My interest rate used to be 15% and now its 23%. They wont lower my interest rate and I dont know why. I did miss two payments this summer because I was between jobs and I even told them I was looking for a job and could not afford to pay the balance, but they didn’t give a crap. What can I do to get a lower interest rate? Spammers dont even bother answering this question because your worthless answer will be deleted.

    • #323227
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      look at your coverage but it should

    • #444371
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      look at your coverage but it should

    • #323228
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Check your policy. Some may, but it might depend on what is causing the failure.

    • #444372
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Check your policy. Some may, but it might depend on what is causing the failure.

    • #323229
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      No, homeowners policies specifically exclude foundations and retaining walls.

    • #444373
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      No, homeowners policies specifically exclude foundations and retaining walls.

    • #323230
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Probably not, the loss will have to be caused by a covered peril,
      like fire, water, lighting ect. but check your policy.

    • #444374
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Probably not, the loss will have to be caused by a covered peril,
      like fire, water, lighting ect. but check your policy.

    • #323231
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Gosh, that’s a tough one. Sorry to hear about the wall.

      I want to try to give you a couple different avenues to pursue for this, to give you the best chance to be made whole. Unfortunately, this is probably going to be one of those things that may require a lengthy battle on your part.

      Not knowing the specifics of the wall (when it was built, how it was built, etc), in general I would expect that walls that play a role in the support of your house would be covered by a homeowner’s policy. But that’s not more than an educated guess.

      To cover all your bases, I’d also recommend finding out a bit more about the wall – who built it, when it was built, how it was built. On your own, you might investigate whether the methods used to install your wall were up to the industry standards of the time. If not, you may also be able to collect from the installer of the wall (or it may yet be under warranty).

      Whatever happens, be sure that the new wall installation design gets reviewed by an engineer (and gets an engineer’s stamp), so that you never have to travel this road again.

      Best of luck!

      Regards,

      Jeff

      PS I just noticed Rosey’s reply – most likely it is the collection of water behind the wall that caused it’s failure, so word your first call to your agent carefully as to the potential cause. Water behind a wall during freeze-thaw cycles causes the majority of wall failures.

    • #444375
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Gosh, that’s a tough one. Sorry to hear about the wall.

      I want to try to give you a couple different avenues to pursue for this, to give you the best chance to be made whole. Unfortunately, this is probably going to be one of those things that may require a lengthy battle on your part.

      Not knowing the specifics of the wall (when it was built, how it was built, etc), in general I would expect that walls that play a role in the support of your house would be covered by a homeowner’s policy. But that’s not more than an educated guess.

      To cover all your bases, I’d also recommend finding out a bit more about the wall – who built it, when it was built, how it was built. On your own, you might investigate whether the methods used to install your wall were up to the industry standards of the time. If not, you may also be able to collect from the installer of the wall (or it may yet be under warranty).

      Whatever happens, be sure that the new wall installation design gets reviewed by an engineer (and gets an engineer’s stamp), so that you never have to travel this road again.

      Best of luck!

      Regards,

      Jeff

      PS I just noticed Rosey’s reply – most likely it is the collection of water behind the wall that caused it’s failure, so word your first call to your agent carefully as to the potential cause. Water behind a wall during freeze-thaw cycles causes the majority of wall failures.

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