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My furnace went out because of a clogged exhaust duct causing extensive damage to my personal property such as all of my plants and fish dying. Also frozen and then broken water pipes caused further damage. I live in Colorado and I am wondering if my landlord has any financial responsibility because of the damages and not being able to stay at the house until the repairs were made? Any help in this matter will be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Deana

7 Thoughts on Does my landlord have any liability for the extensive damage to my personal property when the furnace went out?
  1. Reply
    MoneyMakuhhDontbeaHataa
    February 26, 2013 at 4:04 am

    why was the exhaust duct clogged? or how

    and your plants and fish died because of what? the carbon dioxide? or because you weren’t there to feed them?

    and whats the situation now? are they fixed?

    but you should really call a lawyer/ attorney.. like a paralegal

  2. Reply
    Kathi S
    February 26, 2013 at 4:04 am

    Not to your personal property that is why people get renters insurance. His homeowners will pay for the repairs to the physical property. In most cases you are on your own for the time you had to be out of the house.

  3. Reply
    the kid
    February 26, 2013 at 4:52 am

    That is what your renter’s insurance is for.

  4. Reply
    Iffy
    February 26, 2013 at 5:16 am

    You put a claim in with your renter’s insurance. they in turn will sue your landlord. It is responsibility to insure your belongings.

  5. Reply
    Landlord
    February 26, 2013 at 5:16 am

    No not at all, your insurance covers your things.

    If the house is not habitable the landlord needs to prorate the rent.

  6. Reply
    godged
    February 26, 2013 at 5:48 am

    The landlords insurance and obligation is not for your personal property, that is what renter’s insurance is for. His insurance will pay for damage to his structure, but not your things. If you were not able to stay at the house, the landlord should adjust the rent for the period of time that the house was not inhabitable.

  7. Reply
    My Take on It
    February 26, 2013 at 6:21 am

    Nope
    That is why you need renters insurance. It would have paid for your loss and even paid to put you up in a hotel while the place was being fixed/cleaned. The landlord shouldn’t be charging you rent for the days the place was not habitable.
    Get renters insurance next time if you don’t have it now

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