Article Score0

Mold-obviously. But how old/new should the roof be? What’s better gas heat or electric heat? Do appliances usually convey or is that the exception to the rule? Cheapest house on block right? Oh and what exactly is HVAC? Any tips will be appreciated and everyone is invited to my house for a party when I move in!

6 Thoughts on Buying new to me home what do I “watch out for”?
  1. Reply
    complex.chaos
    October 25, 2011 at 4:32 am

    8– years roof, electric heat is a hair cheaper but it doesnt matter. When you buy a house to make sure you get an expector and a good one! Very important! Also look at what your paying and what you exspect to possibly resell it at in the future.

  2. Reply
    Jcontrols
    October 25, 2011 at 4:36 am

    Electric heat is the most expensive! HVAC is Heating,Cooling,and Ventilation. Most roofs are now good for 25 years or more,depending on the quality of the materials used. Appliances are negotiable with the seller. Check the foundation,basement support timbers,age and guage of wiring,type of plumbing pipe,etc. Best to you! ;-)=

  3. Reply
    girlwhoknowsitstrue
    October 25, 2011 at 5:23 am

    If you had put what country or part of what country that might have been more helpful.

    #1 – a clear title (that means no encumbrances)
    #2 – know what your taxes and liabilities might be (if a condo home, what are the fees and are there any special assessments).
    #3 – where on the block are you – corners are harder for re-sale, ranch re-sells easier than a colonial, tri or quad level hardest to sell.
    #4 – Does the house fit the neighborhood – same style, within the same range
    #5 – House sturdiness – check for insect, water, mold, contaminents within the house (an inspector will also check for you).
    #6 – utilities – make sure that Electric is up to code (preferably circuit breakers, not fuses), plumbing is up to code (no lead solder), no lead paint, windows seal well, floor joists are not rotted. Plug things in and make sure that sockets work, light switches, toilets flush, tubs have hot water, how quick hot water comes on.
    #7 – Major appliances – have furnace, air conditioner (HVAC), garage door opener, sump pump, hot water tank working (For about $ 360, you can buy a 12 month home warranty – worth the money if your house is >10 years old).
    #8 – Check roof, gutters, brickwork, siding – make sure that everything works – make sure that water drains AWAY from the house – water is a houses #1 enemy.
    #9 – Insulation – check attic and basement for sufficient insulation, important in hot and cold climates.
    #10 – sewer / septic – if septic and well, have them checked out.
    #11 – try to avoid “unusual” layouts, like where you have to go through the closet to get to the master bath, or winding stairs that were added after the house was built.

    That should cover the major pains and heartaches of a new house. The market is great for buyers, but there are lots of junk houses on the market, too.

  4. Reply
    Darryl S
    October 25, 2011 at 6:09 am

    First know the more parties you throw, the faster your beautiful new house becomes used abused and war weary. Entertain in smaller more controlled group settings. I prefer gas heat and electric air cond. Helps when there is a power failure, not everything is lost. Check for water in the basement after it rains b/4 you buy if possible, roofs start to go at about 12 years, check for crack in the foundation, either around the exterior, driveway cracking, garage floor cracking. You can even ask to have the structure inspected before you sign. At the seller’s expense of course. Good luck a new home can be fabulous if you look under each rock before buying the pond so to speak.

  5. Reply
    Melissa
    October 25, 2011 at 6:45 am

    Listen to GirlWhoKnows

  6. Reply
    dajuan_n_only
    October 25, 2011 at 7:01 am

    Quick question before you even make that step, have you been pre-qualified for a mortgage? Feel free to log onto http://www.justgetaloan.net for a fast free loan pre-approval with access to great service, programs and rates. Also feel free to contact me direct at 866 530 7300 ext 7305 or by email at [email protected]

    Leave a reply

    Register New Account
    Reset Password